God’s Little Acre

A Novel by Erskine Caldwell
Foreword by Lewis Nordan

Reviews

"What William Faulkner implies, Erskine Caldwell records."


Chicago Tribune

"Caldwell is one of the best . . . a master illusionist who can create, as Hemingway did, an impression of absolute reality."


Time Magazine


"A beautifully integrated story of the barren southern farm and the shut southern mill, and one of the finest studies of the southern poor white which has ever come into our literature. Writing in the brutal images of the life of his poor white people, Mr. Caldwell has caught in poetic quality the debased and futile aspiration of men and women restless in a world of long hungers which must be satisfied quickly, if at all."


Saturday Review of Literature

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Description

Like Tobacco Road, this novel chronicles the final decline of a poor white family in rural Georgia. Exhorted by their patriarch Ty Ty, the Waldens ruin their land by digging it up in search of gold. Complex sexual entanglements and betrayals lead to a murder within the family that completes its dissolution. Juxtaposed against the Waldens' obsessive search is the story of Ty Ty's son-in-law, a cotton mill worker in a nearby town who is killed during a strike.

First published in 1933, God's Little Acre was censured by the Georgia Literary Commission, banned in Boston, and once led the all-time best-seller list, with more than ten million copies in print.

Page count: 224 pp.
Trim size: 5.5 x 8.5

Read more about Erskine Caldwell at the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

 



Paper
List price: $20.95
978-0-8203-1663-5
1995

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Erskine Caldwell (1903–1987) was born in Newnan, Georgia. He became one of America's most widely read, prolific, and critically debated writers, with a literary output of more than sixty titles. At the time of his death, Caldwell's books had sold eighty million copies worldwide in more than forty languages. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1984.